Friday, February 12, 2016

Wanted in China: More Male Teachers, to Make Boys Men

A NYtimes article "Wanted in China: More Male Teachers, to Make Boys Men
By JAVIER C. HERNÁNDEZFEB. 6, 2016"

starts like that:

"FUZHOU, China — The history class began with a lesson on being manly.

Lin Wei, 27, one of a handful of male sixth-grade teachers at a primary school here, has made a habit of telling stories about warlords who threw witches into rivers and soldiers who outsmarted Japanese troops. “Men have special duties,” he said. “They have to be brave, protect women and take responsibility for wrongdoing.”

Worried that a shortage of male teachers has produced a generation of timid, self-centered and effeminate boys, Chinese educators are working to reinforce traditional gender roles and values in the classroom.

and then there is

"Zhou Jiahao, 18, a senior at the school, said he did not think China faced a masculinity crisis in its classrooms. But he said boys felt more confident when they took classes together. The school offers courses in etiquette, coding and wilderness survival, among others.

“In classes with female students, we might not dare speak out,” he said. “When it’s just boys, we feel much freer.”"

This of course is not exactly what we seem to see in studies in US colleges, see my older blogpost on Women don't speak up! here

Thanks to David Yang

Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Immigrants and Gender Roles: Assimilation vs. Culture

Les Picker at the NBER digest writes about a paper by Francine D. Blau

"Immigrants and Gender Roles: Assimilation vs. Culture"

The abstract reads:

"This paper examines evidence on the role of assimilation versus source country culture in influencing immigrant women’s behavior in the United States—looking both over time with immigrants’ residence in the United States and across immigrant generations. It focuses particularly on labor supply but, for the second generation, also examines fertility and education. We find considerable evidence that immigrant source country gender roles influence immigrant and second generation women’s behavior in the United States. This conclusion is robust to various efforts to rule out the effect of other unobservables and to distinguish the effect of culture from that of social capital. These results support a growing literature that suggests that culture matters for economic behavior. At the same time, the results suggest considerable evidence of assimilation of immigrants. Immigrant women narrow the labor supply gap with native-born women with time in the United States, and, while our results suggest an important role for intergenerational transmission, they also indicate considerable convergence of immigrants to native levels of schooling, fertility, and labor supply across generations."

Les Picker writes about that paper:
"Source country gender roles influence immigrants' behavior in the United States, even among second-generation women, but assimilation also occurs.

Immigrants are an increasing presence in the United States. The share of the foreign-born in the population grew from 4.8 percent in 1970 to 12.9 percent in 2012, and the share of U.S. children who were immigrants themselves or who had at least one immigrant parent increased from 13 percent in 1990 to 23 percent in 2008.

Along with the rise in immigrant population has come a shift in the predominant origins of immigrants. The principal source of immigrants has shifted from countries in Europe, with cultures that are broadly similar to that of the United States, to regions with very different cultures and traditions. How much does an immigrant's source country affect their adjustment to American life? What role does assimilation play in that adjustment? Do differences between immigrants and natives in labor supply, education, and fertility carry over to the second generation, or do second generation women fully assimilate to native patterns?

In Immigrants and Gender Roles: Assimilation vs. Culture (NBER Working Paper No. 21756), Francine D. Blau reports on a research program with Lawrence M. Kahn that examines the roles of assimilation and source country culture as influences on immigrant women's behavior. The research focuses in particular on labor supply because immigrants increasingly come from countries that have a more gender-based division of labor than is currently the case in the United States. Typically, the source countries have lower female labor force participation rates and higher fertility rates than the United States. There has been a growing gap between the labor supply of native and immigrant women in the U.S. since 1980.

The researchers find considerable evidence that source country gender roles influence immigrants' behavior. This influence appears to extend to second-generation women. At the same time, they also find evidence of assimilation. Immigrant women narrow the labor supply gap with native-born women as they spend more time in the United States. There is also considerable convergence of immigrants to native levels of schooling, fertility, and labor supply across generations. For second-generation women, fertility and labor supply in their mother's source country have a larger association with their behavior than the corresponding practices in their father's source country.

Blau points out that in the future, immigrant source countries may become more similar to the United States, thus reducing the effect of source country gender roles on the behavior of first- and second-generation immigrant women. This has already begun to happen with respect to fertility. The fertility of immigrant women relative to natives has been falling rapidly in the most recent immigrant cohorts."




Tuesday, February 9, 2016

How Economists Would Fix Online Dating

My work with Soo Lee on roses was mentioned in a Wall Street Journal article By CHRISTOPHER MIMS on Feb. 8, 2016

How Economists Would Fix Online Dating
A ‘thick’ market and cost-benefit analysis help avoid ‘romantic unemployment’

"One recent experiment in improving online dating sites through signaling mechanisms, conducted by economists Soohyung Lee and Muriel Niederle, gave members of a Korean dating site a limited number of virtual roses, meant to indicate special interest in a person, to include with their messages to potential matches. The result was that people were more likely to respond to those who sent them a rose..."

I think here is a version open to everyone

Monday, February 8, 2016

Competitiveness and Wages of MBA's

This is a paper I always wanted to write:

Reuben, E., P. Sapienza, and L. Zingales: "Taste for competition and the gender gap among young business professionals,"

There are two reasons I find this work interesting: First, it related to a literature that helps understand what psychological traits are linked to labor market outcomes. Second, it shows the external relevance of competitiveness: see also my paper with Thomas Buser and Hessel Oosterbeek:  Gender, Competitiveness and Career Choices,” Quarterly Journal of Economics, August 2014, 129 (3): 1409-1447, and see also my former blogposts  here and here)

The abstract reads:

"Using an incentivized measure of individuals’ taste for competition, this paper investigates whether this taste explains subsequent gender differences in earnings and industry choice in a sample of high ability MBA graduates. We find that “competitive” individuals earn 9% more than their less competitive counterparts do. Moreover, gender differences in taste for competition explain around 10% of the overall gender gap. We also find that competitive individuals are more likely to work in high-paying industries nine years later, which suggests that the relation between taste for competition and earnings persists in the long run. Lastly, we find that the effect of taste for competition emerges over time when MBAs and firms interact with each other."

Their main results can be seen in the following figures and tables:
First even among MBA's it seems there is a gender gap in tournament entry.


While risk aversion and confidence can account for some of that gender gap in tournament entry, a substantial gender gap remains.



Second, male MBA's have a higher salary after graduation than female MBA's.


Now, to assess the external relevance of competitiveness:


Competitiveness is highly positively correlated with higher earnings.


Finally, competitiveness remains an important variable even controlling for gender, and can account for about 10% of the gender gap in earnings.

They write:
"How important is the role of taste for competition in accounting for the gender gap in earnings? One way to answer this question is to compare the impact of taste for competition on the gender coefficient to the impact of other control variables on the same coefficient. This can be done by looking at column III, which includes all the variables in Table 1 except for the choice of tournament. Including these control variables noticeability reduces the gender gap by 20.7% (the gender coefficient changes from–0.122 to –0.097). This result puts the effect of taste for competition in perspective. Namely, the single experimental measure of taste for competition explains around half as much of the gender gap in earnings as a rich set of variables that include demographic characteristics, academic performance, and experimental and survey measures of important psychological attributes."

Finally, they have a great section to address to what extent competitiveness is really distinct from risk aversion: They write the following:

"Taste for competition and the choice of tournament

A clever feature of the experimental design of Niederle and Vesterlund (2007) is that participants make two choices between tournament and piece-rate. In one case, participants perform under the chosen payment scheme while in the other case the payment scheme is simply applied to their past performance (see section 3.1). We will refer to the choice of the tournament in the latter case as “uncompetitive tournament choice.” Because it does not include performing in a competitive environment, Niederle and Vesterlund (2007) argue that the choice between piece-rate and uncompetitive tournament is unaffected by the participants’ attitudes towards competition. If this is the case and the association between earnings and choosing the tournament is driven by taste for competition, then we should observe a weaker relation between earnings and uncompetitive tournament.

To evaluate whether choosing uncompetitive tournament is associated with earnings, we run regressions like the ones reported in columns II and IV of Table 3. In some regressions, we simply substitute tournament with uncompetitive tournament. We find that the coefficients for uncompetitive tournament are positive, but they are not statistically significant and they are half as large as the comparable coefficient in Table 3. In addition, the change in the gender coefficient due to the inclusion of uncompetitive tournament is much smaller and is not statistically significant. In other regressions, we include both tournament and uncompetitive tournament. We find that the coefficient for tournament is both economically and statistically significant whereas the coefficient for uncompetitive tournament is close to zero and far from statistical significance. These results provide compelling evidence that the association between tournament and earnings is indeed driven by the participants’ attitudes towards competition and is not related to the choice of a tournament per se."

Thursday, February 4, 2016

economics and women

This is a link to an old article I keep coming back to, so, to remember it, here is a blog post about it:

The Washington Post ran the following on March 10, 2014: "Catherine Rampell: Women should embrace the B’s in college to make more later"

Here is the killer figure:


The article writes:

"Claudia Goldin, an economics professor at Harvard, has been examining why so few women major in her field . The majority of new college grads are female, yet women receive only 29 percent of bachelor’s degrees in economics each year.

Goldin looked at how grades awarded in an introductory economics class affected the chance that a student would ultimately major in the subject. She found that the likelihood a woman would major in economics dropped steadily as her grade fell: Women who received a B in Econ 101, for example, were about half as likely as women who received A’s to stick with the discipline. The same discouragement gradient didn’t exist for men. Of Econ 101 students, men who received A’s were about equally as likely as men who received B’s to concentrate in the dismal science."

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

discrimination and IAT

There is a new WP "Discrimination as a Self-Fulfilling Prophecy: Evidence from French Grocery Stores", by Dylan Glover, Amanda Pallais and William Pariente.

The abstract reads:
Examining the performance of cashiers in a French grocery store chain, we find that manager bias negatively affects minority job performance. In the stores studied, cashiers work with different managers on different days and their schedules are determined quasi-randomly. When minority cashiers, but not majority cashiers, are scheduled to work with managers who are biased (as determined by an Implicit Association Test), they are absent more often, spend less time at work, scan items more slowly, and take more time between customers. Manager bias has consequences for the average performance of minority workers: while on average minority and majority workers perform equivalently, on days where managers are unbiased, minorities perform significantly better than majority workers."

here are the two main figures




Tuesday, February 2, 2016

conferences and workshops

Two Things to participate in (where I got asked to recommend it to others)

ONE:

CSWEP Call for Abstracts – CSWEP Sessions @ 2017 American Economic Association Meeting

Chicago, IL - Hyatt Regency Chicago, January 6-8, 2017

Deadline: March 7, 2016.

CSWEP invites abstract submissions for paper presentation at six CSWEP-sponsored sessions at the 2017 ASSA/AEA Meeting in Chicago.

Two sessions will be focused on Gender-related topics.  Note that this year CSWEP is particularly interested in orienting one of the gender sessions around the economics of gender in the economics profession, although the decision to sponsor a session on this topic will depend on the number and quality of submissions.

Two sessions will be from the field of Educational Economics and two sessions will be from the field of Environmental/Energy Economics.

CSWEP's primary intention in organizing these sessions is to create an opportunity for junior women to present papers at economics meetings; and to provide them an opportunity to meet with and receive feedback from leading economists in their field.  The term junior woman usually refers to a woman who is untenured, or who has received her PhD less than seven years ago; but could also refer to a woman who has not yet presented papers widely.  Coauthors may be of either sex and may be junior or senior.  Junior men may author papers in the gender-related sessions.

CSWEP sessions also aim to encourage quality research, particularly in the area of gender-related topics and in other fields dominated by men, and to encourage junior women to publish their research. As such, the organizers of the AEA sessions will select a subset the presented papers for publication in the May 2017 Papers & Proceedings issue of the American Economic Review. Authors of accepted abstracts will be invited to submit their paper for publication consideration in advance of the paper sessions.

In addition to individual paper submissions, complete session proposals may be submitted, but the papers in the session proposal will be considered individually. Duplication of paper presentation at multiple AEA Sessions is not permitted, therefore authors will be expected to notify CSWEP immediately and withdraw their abstract if their paper is accepted for a non-CSWEP session at the 2017 AEA Meeting. Similarly, authors whose paper is accepted to a 2017 CSWEP session will be expected to withdraw it from consideration by any other organization at the same meetings.

The deadline for submission is March 7, 2016.

To have research considered for the CSWEP-sponsored sessions at the 2017 AEA Meeting, the Correspondence Author must complete an online submission form and upload an abstract at: http://bit.ly/1ZI59sr

The application form will ask for the following information:

1. Indication of submission to either the Gender-related Topics, Economics of Gender in the Economics Profession, Educational Economics or Environmental/Energy Economics sessions.  Note that all applications submitted to the Economics of Gender in the Economics Profession will automatically be considered for the Gender-related Topics as well.

2. Indication of a single abstract submission or a complete session submission.

3. The Name, Title, Affiliation, Mailing Address and Email for the correspondence author or session organizer.

4. Name (s), Title(s), Affiliation(s) and Email address(es) for any coauthor(s) or for each corresponding author in a complete session submission.

The abstract should be a PDF document, with a length not to exceed two pages, double-spaced, and with a maximum of 650 words.  Name the file: “Abstract_Corresponding Author Last Name-First Name.”  The abstract should contain details on motivation, contribution, methodology and data (if applicable); and be clearly identified with the author(s) name(s).  Completed papers may be sent but may not substitute for an abstract of the appropriate length.

Questions can be addressed to Jennifer Socey, CSWEP Admin, cswep@econ.duke.edu.

Thank you!

Jennifer Socey, Admin Assistant
American Economic Association
Committee for the Status of Women in the Economics Profession
Department of Economics, Duke University
Box 90097, Durham, N.C. 27708

(ph) 919-681-4365
(fax) 919-684-8974

SECOND

Dear all,   
as already for 8 years we invite PhD students, young assistant professors, and researchers in central banks to our 9th BESLab Experimental Economics Summer School in Macroeconomics in Universitat Pompeu Fabra, June 13-19, 2016 . see online program and lecturers here

This week also includes an attendance at a 2 day workshop (16-17 June) within the Barcelona GSE summer forum on Theoretical and Experimental Macroeconomics. The keynote speakers workshop are In-Koo Cho (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) and Albert Marcet (ICREA-IAE and Barcelona GSE). 
The workshop intends to promote an active exchange and interaction of ideas and work on macroeconomic issues from behavioral, experimental, and/or theoretical approaches, and therefore seek a good mix of theory and experimental papers, jointly organized by Barcelona GSE and by BES Lab (Behavioral and Experimental Sciences Lab, before called LEEX) at Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
Download Call for Papers (pdf) for workshop 
Submit a Paper (apply form) for worshop 

For over 30 years, macroeconomic models have had explicit micro foundations about the behavior of firms, consumers and government agencies, leading to closer ties between micro/game theorists and macro theorists. On the applied side, the assumptions and predictions of macroeconomic models have historically been tested using non-experimental field data as collected by government agencies. An alternative empirical approach attracting increased attention is to evaluate these models using controlled laboratory settings with human subjects, minimizing noisy and confounding factors present in field data. The experimental findings can be informative about questions like equilibrium selection or the efficacy of various government policies.A recent survey on macro experiments can be found in “Macroeconomics: A Survey of Laboratory Research” by John Duffy, available here.
Organizers of workshop and summer school